Quite often I’ve accidentally typed “git” twice. Usually this is fine, and Git just does something like this:

$ git git diff
git: 'git' is not a git command. See 'git --help'.

Did you mean this?
    init

But I recently turned on Git’s autocorrect feature, to see what it was like (git config --global help.autocorrect 1). The results were… interesting:

$ git git diff
WARNING: You called a Git command named 'git', which does not exist.
Continuing under the assumption that you meant 'init' in **0.1 seconds** automatically...
fatal: internal error: work tree has already been set
Current worktree: /nfs/personaldev/vagrant/mobileweb-v2
New worktree: /nfs/personaldev/vagrant/mobileweb-v2/diff

This is really bizarre behaviour. The fact that it wants to autocorrect it to git init is sort-of okay. But rather than giving me the option to confirm that this is what I want, Git gives me a whole 0.1 seconds to hit Ctrl+C before it automatically runs the command for me.

Thankfully, git init isn’t a very destructive command. I was lucky that the only side effect of this was that Git created a new directory called diff. I can’t help but wonder what would’ve happened if Git decided to autocorrect to a more destructive command like reset, checkout, or gc.

The lesson here? Don’t use Git’s autocorrect. It really sucks.

Update: m_bright pointed out that the value of help.autocorrect is actually how many tenths of a second Git will wait before automatically executing the command. So something like git config --global help.autocorrect 10 would give you 1 second before the command is executed, which is probably slow enough to let you cancel any mistakes, and quick enough to still be useful.